Veni vedi WeHoP – part 3 – fabulous plants, color, and texture

While the previous two posts about our awesome adventure focused more on overall shots and a chronological narrative of our trip, I figured I’d cram a few more photos into a final post on the matter. It was such a sensorily magnificent day that I found no way to convey it all without singling out my favorite plant shots and combos. Forgive me my lousy memory, and the fact that I didn’t take any notes. For the most part, you’re just going to have to enjoy them for what they are, and improvise if you decide to replicate.

If I ever get my Dr. Seuss garden, I will be sure to include some of these. So cool...

If I ever get my Dr. Seuss garden, I will be sure to include some of these. So cool…

For some reason, the flat straps of this aloe (I think) reminded me of going through a carwash.

For some reason, the flat straps of this aloe (I think) reminded me of going through a carwash.

From Valley Nursery.

Such fabulous color in the Valley Nursery displays.

This too.

From the Heronswood Gardens. Would love to know what that fabulous shrub with the serrated leaves is. Anyone?

Sanguisorba cascading down over a wall.

Sanguisorba cascading down over a wall.

Fruit of Cornus Kousa.

Dropped fruit of Cornus Kousa.

IMG_5963

What fabulous black spheres!

What fabulous black spheres! Alison – what is this one again?

Close-up.

Close-up of a low-growing Aconitum. You can really see why the common name is Monkshood.

Woodwardia fern at Heronswood.

Woodwardia fern at Heronswood.

IMG_5983

Who needs fireworks when you have this one?

This Tillandsia-covered tree root is to die for!

This Tillandsia and fern-covered tree root is to die for! I think the grass in the front is Mondo grass.

I love the contrast of the large Rodgersia leaves against the Mondo grass.

I love the contrast of the large Rodgersia leaves against the Mondo grass.

I'm pretty sure the  beaded, arching twigs are the skeletal remains of a Crambe cordifolia, which I think is a fantastic plant. In bloom it is a veritable cloud of small, white flowers. Even after its prime, it looks great offset against the dark foliage of a Berberis.

I’m pretty sure the beaded, arching twigs are the skeletal remains of a Crambe cordifolia, which I think is a fantastic plant. In bloom it is a veritable cloud of small, white flowers. Even after its prime, it looks great offset against the dark foliage of a Berberis.

I thought the red flower stem of this Rhubarb was so striking!

I thought the red flower stem of this Rhubarb was so striking!

Everyone who knows me knows that pink is usually not my thing, but I really thought these lilies were beautiful.

Everyone who knows me knows that pink is usually not my thing, but I really thought these lilies were beautiful.

Who can tell me what this is?

Who can tell me what this is?

Even after they finished blooming, these Agapanthus look wonderful.

Even after they finished blooming, these Agapanthus look shaggy and wonderful.

This is some kind of Acacia. Jeff at Celestial said he would have some ready for sale next year. I'm already salivating...

This is some kind of Acacia. Jeff at Celestial said he would have some ready for sale next year. I’m already salivating…

Just look at that foliage from afar! Isn't that stunning? I'm not too keen on the Dahlias in the foreground. If it were my tree, I would have put some spiky, reddish drama there, for contrast.

Just look at that foliage from afar! Isn’t that stunning? I’m not too keen on the Dahlias in the foreground. If it were my tree, I would have put some spiky, reddish drama there, for contrast.

I have a definite soft spot for turkscap-shaped flowers of all kinds. This Clematis tangutica is no exception. The yellow flowers with the fuzzy brown centers are adorable. They have phenomenal seed heads too!

I have a definite soft spot for turkscap-shaped flowers of all kinds. This Clematis tangutica is no exception. The yellow flowers with the fuzzy brown centers are adorable. They have phenomenal seed heads too!

I'm surprising myself. I have liked several pink things already. For some reason, there is something really appealing about this combo - both texturally and color-wise.

I’m surprising myself. I have liked several pink things already. For some reason, there is something really appealing about this combo – both texturally and color-wise.

Flowering cacti, rocks, grasses and driftwood. Perfection!

Flowering cacti, rocks, grasses and driftwood. Perfection!

IMG_6038

So otherworldly...

So otherworldly…

For some reason, I really liked these. Must be the orange with the brown and green.

For some reason, I really liked these. Such interesting colors and textures. Must be the waxy orange with the brown and green.

This made me think of a bridal veil. Shayne said there had just been a wedding in his garden a few weeks earlier.

This made me think of a bridal veil. Shayne said there had just been a wedding in his garden a few weeks earlier.

Amazing how effective just white and green can be. Check this one out!

Amazing how effective just white and green can be. Check this one out!

I think I need to get myself an Abutilon. When I saw this, I just melted...

I think I need to get myself an Abutilon. When I saw this, my heart quivered just a little.

Oh, the textures!

Oh, the textures!

Shayne said this one was his absolute favorite. Of course I can't remember what it is called.

Shayne said this one was his absolute favorite. Of course I can’t remember what it is called.

The massive seed pods of a Himalayan lily. I learned they can get up to 14' tall.

The massive seed pods of a Himalayan lily. I learned they can get up to 14′ tall.

One of the WeHoP arrangements. I'm no fan of wax begonias, but in this case I'm willing to live with them. Great color combo!

One of the WeHoP arrangements. I’m no fan of wax begonias, but in this case I’m willing to live with them. Great color combo!

More foliar pizzazz from WeHoP.

More foliar pizzazz from WeHoP.

So pretty!

So pretty!

I enjoyed the variety and juxtaposition of the textures in this one.

I enjoyed the variety and juxtaposition of the textures in this one.

Finally one of my favorite visuals provided by the plants that came home with one of us. These two look so good together! Too bad that one likes it hot, whereas the other lights up shady corners, so a successful marriage in a garden is highly unlikely.  But they look great together, don't they?

Finally one of my favorite visuals provided by the plants that came home with one of us. These two look so good together! Too bad that one likes it hot and dry, whereas the other dwells best in a damp and shady corners A successful marriage in a garden setting is highly unlikely. But they do look great together, don’t they?

And that, my friends, concludes my musings on our trip to the Kitsap peninsula. So what did I bring home, you wonder? The list is below, and you’ll no doubt be surprised to learn that contrary to the norm, they are all already in the ground. Yes, it is unusual, I know, but beyond the fact that I am now less likely to kill them, there is no reason to rejoice. True to form, they will all be moved before long, once I find them a more suitable spot. Change is good.

Polygonatum verticillatum

Polygonatum verticillatum

Cautelya spicata 'Robusta'

Cautelya spicata ‘Robusta’ (sorry for the blurriness – the car ride was occasionally bumpy.)

Agave montana

Agave montana

IMG_6121

Kniphofia ‘Rockette’

Syneilesis aconitifolia

Curculigo sp.JMc

Sauromatum venosum

Colocasia esculenta ‘Black Magic’

Meconopsis ‘Lingholm’

Astilboides tabularis

Comptonia peregrina ‘Sweet Fern’

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About annamadeit

Born and raised in Sweden, my aesthetics and outlook on life are strongly shaped by a culture rich in history and tradition. I care a great deal about environmental responsibility, and my aesthetic reflects the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia. I was trained as an architect at the University of Cincinnati and as a color specialist at the Scandinavian Colour Institute in Stockholm. I'm obsessed with plants and gardens, and aim to take my skill set a step further by designing gardens as well as interiors. As someone so aptly said: " Architecture is the skin that separates the exterior from the interior". So true - you can't successfully focus on one without incorporating the other. I'm also an avid cook, and I love to ski. In addition, I put time and efforts into trying to rectify things that I feel are wrong in my immediate community. As you will see, The Creative Flux will touch on all these things, and more. For sure, it's all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blog!
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16 Responses to Veni vedi WeHoP – part 3 – fabulous plants, color, and texture

  1. Scott Weber says:

    Looks like you had quite the trip! I think the mystery black spheres are Aralia blooms/seedpods. The pink spike flower is Persicaria of some sort (I believe).

  2. Alison says:

    Yes, the black spheres are Aralia californica. I didn’t realize you had bought a Cautelya. I saw that one a couple of times on Saturday, and I think now I’m sorry I didn’t buy one. You should definitely get an Abutilon. I have one, and I love it. I need to get more.

    • annamadeit says:

      Aralia californica… now that I’ve seen it in writing, maybe it will stick. I really wish I had room – it is so cool! Actually it was Charlie who bought a Cautleya first, at the Heronswood sale. I spent time with it in the backseat throughout our trip, and realized how cool it was. When we got to Far Reaches, I realized they had one, so I snagged it. If it multiplies, I’ll share. And yes, the Abutilon… so dreamy! It’s on my list…

  3. Tonya Cole says:

    Anna, it was fun talking with you and we were so happy to have all of you up to the garden. After reading your posts, I’m really curious about that Cowboy’s garden! Have fun with your newly found plant treasures.

    • annamadeit says:

      Tonya – it was great to talk with you too! We had such a fabulous day, and I’m proud to tell you that all my new treasures are in the ground. Not in their final destination mind you, but pending that – they are happy for now. I really hope you get to see Shayne’s garden – it is a paradise, and obviously a labor of both love and talent. Hope to see you again soon!

  4. Ricki Grady says:

    You zeroed in on some pretty wonderful stuff, especially the foliage combos…and your purchases! Yowza!

    • annamadeit says:

      Oh Ricki – what am I going to do with all those new plants…? I really do have an addiction problem… But one is lovelier than the other, and I can’t help myself. I do think it’s time I moved to a bigger lot…

  5. I hope you find out what the serrated leaves belong to (at Heronswood) I don’t remember seeing that one but if I did I probably would have melted in front of it and not moved an inch. Can I use your photo in my post (with attribution of course) in hopes someone might identify it?

  6. Heather says:

    You got some incredible shots! I am officially agog.

    • annamadeit says:

      Thank you! Wish you could have been there – photos really don’t do it justice. Speaking of which – you need to take a break and come see my purple wall. Finished it on Sunday, and am happy as a clam with it! πŸ™‚

  7. Anna,
    Mystery shrub — I sent you an email with photos. Not sure it is the same as the one in your post, but my neighbor’s is a fruit-bearing pear. -Julie

    • annamadeit says:

      Thanks Julie, for investigating! I answered your email… Although similar, I don’t think that’s it. Those edges were so unusual and striking… I think the search has to go on…

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