Belated Bloom Day and Foliage Follow-up – March 2014

…. or as it could also be called; “The dance of the yet unplanted”. Temperature-wise, this winter was a rough one, and it was also a very busy one. So busy, in fact, that most everything procured last fall are still languishing in their pots – or in the case of some most unfortunate bulbs – still in their bags. Oh horror! Luckily, there were some previously planted things that could bring spring cheer when I needed it the most.

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The most delightful surprise is the Daphne. After a winter where most everyone else’s Daphnes dropped most of their leaves. I think mine powered through because of where it is – sheltered under a majestic evergreen Magnolia, and backed up by a Fatsia japonica. It dropped a few, but very little comparatively. And it smells so GOOD!

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In return for the lost leaves, it seems it doubled up on flowers, but this is probably just my imagination. Whatever it is, I can’t recall ever seeing it covered in clusters of flowers all the way up the stem like this.

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The Edgeworthia in the backyard fared much worse. Although I did cover it up, the freeze burned off most of its blossoms this year. Behind the branches, you can see the outlines of a broken pot turned upside down. I put it there to protect a baby Tetrapanax from at least some of the winds. I don’t think it worked – for all intents and purposes, it looks decidedly dead. Ever the optimist, I’m leaving it in the ground just in case. Just in case…

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Like a Christmas tree at a pre-school – decorated by the pint-sized constituents – the few flowers that made it are all around the very bottom of the shrub. I was so excited to see them!

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For as much as it had been whipped around by the howling east-winds, I really didn’t think I would get much out of the Clematis armandii ‘Appleblossom’ this spring. Ha! I was totally wrong!

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I confess to only being a moderate fan of Andromedas but the fiery red new shoots of Pieris ‘Forest Flame’ earns it its spot in the garden every spring. However, this past winter I learned something vital that made me appreciate it so much more – this plant is a hugely important source of food for our native bees. We have over 4,000 of them in Oregon alone.

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Our native Sword ferns made it through largely unscathed…

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… as did the Tassel ferns, which are coming forth full force.

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The Birdsnest fern took a bit of a beating, but I love the decorative “stitching” along the curled-up edges.

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Like a butterfly emerging from its chrysalis, the Podophyllum pleianthum is unfolding its massive leaves from its “pupas”. It is a sight to behold!

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The painted mosaic of the leaves of the prolific self-seeder Arum italicum ‘Pictum’ is a welcome sight wherever it pops up.

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Vancouveria hexandra sticks its furry little head out of the ground. When I first saw this plant, I thought it was a Maidenhair fern on steroids, but soon learned that it can hold its own even in such distinguished company. It gets really cool flowers in the summers too – dainty as can be.

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Hellebores abound – I LOVE THEM! This one is still in its pot. The ferny foliage you see in the background is a blooming Grevillea ‘Scarlet Sprite’ – also still in its pot.

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Another recent acquisition – bought from Dan Hinkley at our recent Plant Nerd Night – also still in its pot. Really, someone needs to hide my wallet…

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This one is lucky. Sure, it’s out of focus, but at least it is in the ground!

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The Hydrangeas are sprouting. They are going to be evicted this year – I’m too stingy with the water, so they never really seem to do all that well. Besides they are too big for my mini garden. I think they need a new home where they can be allowed to shine!

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A spring time favorite, purchased last week at the grocery store. Yup – still unplanted.

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Anemone hepatica – or ‘Blåsippa’ in my native Sweden. The photo is from a couple of weeks ago, but it is still going strong. A little worse for the wear after the torrential rains we’ve been having, but still gorgeous. This is one of my all-time favorites.

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It could probably be said that I have a thing for Anemones and Ranunculus, period. I couldn’t resist a couple of them the other day at the grocery store. This week, I got sworn in for my American citizenship. It dawned on me that paired with these white daffodils, I suppose they could represent my new flag…

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… just as paired with the yellow of mini-daffodils, this nice blue one can easily represent the flag of my other country. The blackened casualty in the background is one of winter’s victims – an Acacia dealbata planted last spring. It was nice while it lasted, and now I can put something else in its stead. But what…?

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Rip van Winkle – the most adorable of the mini-daffodils. So cute – like a little solar flare!

Head over to Carol and May Dreams Gardens, and Pam at Digging to see what else is sprouting in gardens across the nation and the world this month. The next time I post, it will be Spring! Hooray! 🙂

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About annamadeit

Born and raised in Sweden, my aesthetics and outlook on life are strongly shaped by a culture rich in history and tradition. I care a great deal about environmental responsibility, and my aesthetic reflects the visually clean, functional practicality and sustainable solutions that are the hallmarks of modern Scandinavia. I was trained as an architect at the University of Cincinnati and as a color specialist at the Scandinavian Colour Institute in Stockholm. I'm obsessed with plants and gardens, and aim to take my skill set a step further by designing gardens as well as interiors. As someone so aptly said: " Architecture is the skin that separates the exterior from the interior". So true - you can't successfully focus on one without incorporating the other. I'm also an avid cook, and I love to ski. In addition, I put time and efforts into trying to rectify things that I feel are wrong in my immediate community. As you will see, The Creative Flux will touch on all these things, and more. For sure, it's all over the map, but then again - so am I! Welcome to my blog!
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19 Responses to Belated Bloom Day and Foliage Follow-up – March 2014

  1. Wow that Pieris ‘Forest Flame’ really fooled my eye, I thought the new growth were fabulous flowers. So I have to ask, especially since you pointed out the grevillea, how did you keep all these unplanted plants alive during the cold, snow and ice events this winter?

    • annamadeit says:

      Loree, they spent most of the winter in a small garden shed. Unheated, and with a concrete floor, I put some packing foam on the floor under the largest pots to give them a little more protection. The smaller ones were off the floor on shelves. And during the worst cold spells, I draped some old, incandescent string lights around the space hoping it would emit enough heat to raise temps a little. I still lost a few things – a pineapple lily, and probably all the Cannas, turned to mush – but most things seem to have made it, even though they don’t look all that great – yet. But spring is the time for healing and recuperation, right?

  2. Pam/Digging says:

    I recently planted a few plants that I’d acquired nearly 6 months ago, and I still have one in its nursery pot from last summer. I’m glad to know I’m not alone in this! I enjoyed your foliage pics, particularly the arum leaves.

    • annamadeit says:

      Haha – I think it’s a pretty common gardener affliction! Hopefully I can make some headway tomorrow – I have the day off. Rain or shine, I’ll be out there!

  3. Alison says:

    I still have loads of plants in pots waiting to get in the ground. My back problems in the fall set me back, but actually, plants in nursery pots is standard procedure here. Glad you finally made it to GBBD and FF! I saw on another blog post (I think) that Daphne does that when it loses leaves.

    • annamadeit says:

      Sorry about your back problems, Alison. They are bad enough for anyone, but when you’re a gardener, it’s even worse. Good to hear about the Daphne – I guess I wasn’t dreaming after all!

  4. Elvis says:

    You have so many blooms! For your self-described mini-garden, you pack a lot into the space. I love the color and shape of Anemone hepatica and must look for it to add to my garden – I have so very few spring flower bulbs. And I had the same experience as you with my Daphne – little damage (thank goodness) and blooms along many of the leafless stems. Happy belated Bloom Day and Foliage Follow-up!

    • annamadeit says:

      If I see one in my travels, or if mine should set seed anytime soon, I will snag it for you, Jane. And yes, I think I’m addicted to spring bulbs. The worst part is I never ever remember where I planted them (if they even get into the ground on time..)

    • annamadeit says:

      Jane – you won’t believe this! I just realized I actually wrote down in my Giant Garden Spreadsheet where I got the Hepatica. (I also misnamed it – it is called Hepatica nobilis.) Anyway, it came from Sundquist Nursery http://www.sqnursery.com. I think he does mail order…

  5. Ricki Grady says:

    And now it IS Spring! Have shovel, will travel, if you ever want help on one of your rare days off. Still smiling at the “pint sized constituents” description.

    • annamadeit says:

      🙂 Oh, how I wish I could take you up on that! Actually, I just might! I’m “off” tomorrow, but have to “work” on procuring plants for a project. Normally, I would love that, but I SO wanted to be outside planting… (Can’t believe I just sounded whiny about plant shopping! … Unreal…)

  6. beautiful post! please come tend my garden. It needs nurturing and loving and creative inspiration. will supply shovel and irish tea!

  7. Kris P says:

    It took 3 years for me to get a few blooms on the one Hellebore that survived so I’m mightily impressed by your ability to get blooms from those still in pots. That Anemone hepatica is unbelievably beautiful!

    • annamadeit says:

      Haha – I’m afraid the credit should not go to me – two of those Hellebores are new, and forced by pros at a nursery somewhere. I doubt I would have pulled it off… As for the Hepatica – I got it from Sundquist Nursery (www.sqnursery.com) at a plant event somewhere. (Wow, I can’t believe I was organized enough to write that down in my plant spreadsheet! Now THAT, you should be impressed by! 😉 )

  8. Jenni says:

    The daphne is having a banner year! Wow! And congrats on your citizenship! You have had an extremely busy winter….plants left in pots…well, join the club. We’re all there. Happy Belated GBBD!

    • annamadeit says:

      Thank you, Jenni! It feels really good to have that behind me. And yes, I guess plants in pots is a garden geek’s affliction. This was such a glorious weekend to give some of them homes, and I blew it. I guess another week with won’t make a difference…

  9. Denise says:

    Love the shots of emerging leaves like the podophyllum. Just don’t get that emergence drama in my garden.

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